Joint Exploration – Various Drawings

Following the transformation and construction of our joint (and the subsequent drawings illustrating our process), we were asked to explore the nature of our joint through two new 30″ x 30″ drawings – one showing multiple views of the joint (plan, section, elevation), the other a more “abstract” perspective drawing. I chose to include a blue color-scheme beyond the simple gray tones because I wanted to emphasize the central connector piece, similar to my choice to construct the piece out of wood for the physical model.

A perspective exploration of the joint. I chose to explode the pieces to emphasize/show the inner and outer natures of the joint.

A perspective exploration of the joint. I chose to explode the pieces to emphasize/show the inner and outer natures of the joint.

Another exploration of the joint, utilizing various views (section, plan, and elevation).

Another exploration of the joint, utilizing various views (section, plan, and elevation).

We were also asked to explore the model we had built through photography, experimenting with camera placement, lighting, and various “construction” methods, i.e. organizing the parts of the joints in systems they may not have originally been designed for.

The four final, edited photos, showing various viewpoints and configurations of the joint.

The four final, edited photos, showing various viewpoints and configurations of the joint.

EDIT 06.25.13: added updated drawings.

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Constructing a Pavilion – The Beginning

The main project for our 2nd year Design Studio class is the construction of a pavilion that would theoretically be constructed on an actual site in downtown Troy NY. The pavilion must be constructed as a “flexible” space, allowing for both performances as well as relaxation/lounging, both spontaneous and organized. For our section, the pavilion is limited to roughly 1/3 of the total square footage of the site (or roughly 1500 sq ft out of a total 4600 sq ft), and should address issues such as permanence vs temporariness, exterior vs interior, and public vs private.

To begin the project, each student was given a joint based off of a “connection” between two beams that did not utilize anything other than the beam material (i.e. no external nailing). We were asked to transform these joints in various ways to explore the connection and how it could be opened/closed in various ways. From these transformations we then constructed 4″ x 4″ x 12″ study models of the joint (sometimes multiple times as the joint evolved). I chose a mixture of basswood and cold press (as I wanted to bring out the central piece that attached the outer two pieces) – I was particularly interested in the outer vs. the inner, and how your perception of the joint changed as you took it apart.

Two 15″ x 60″ drawings were also made to illustrate the transformation process – one in axonometric view, the other in plan.

A compilation of the two transformation drawings. The left shows an axonometric view of the joint, while the right shows a plan view of the joint (both top and bottom).

A compilation of the two transformation drawings. The left shows an axonometric view of the joint, while the right shows a plan view of the joint (both top and bottom).

The original study model of the joint (corresponds step 3 on the transformation drawings).

The original study model of the joint (corresponds step 3 on the transformation drawings).

The original study model of the joint, exploded to show its internal nature.

The original study model of the joint, exploded to show its internal nature.

The second iteration (study model) of the joint.

The second iteration (study model) of the joint.

The second iteration (study model) of the joint, exploded to illustrate its internal nature.

The second iteration (study model) of the joint, exploded to illustrate its internal nature.

EDIT 06.25.13: added updated drawings.

Final Site Model – Stage 2

The second stage of our final project was the creation of two sections and one plan of our model as drawings, to allow for proper reading of the conceptualized model. Using color and various line types/weights, the images were some of the more technical ones we had produced during the semester.

A plan of the model. Black represents solid that is being cut through, while all other colors are the actual surfaces as they would be colored. I attempted to use the grid in the background to differentiate between a white surface and the background or "void" in the model (traditionally displayed as white).

A plan of the model. Black represents solid that is being cut through, while all other colors are the actual surfaces as they would be colored. I attempted to use the grid in the background to differentiate between a white surface and the background or “void” in the model (traditionally displayed as white).

A section cut through the foundation of the model. Black represents solid, while white is surface. The various notches/voids where the pieces would site and/or create can be seen throughout the section.

A section cut through the foundation of the model. Black represents solid, while white is surface. The various notches/voids where the pieces would sit and/or create can be seen throughout the section.

This section is more of a shot looking down at the model - no part of the model is actually cut in section. All colors (including black) are representative of the actual colored surface.

This section is more of a shot looking down at the model – no part of the model is actually cut in section. All colors (including black) are representative of the actual colored surface.

Drawing – Phase Two

After our first set of digital drawings were created, we were tasked with the creation of two more digital drawings at 48″ x 18″, one for a pair of our four larger joints. These drawings also used out grids, mars landscape, and various views of our joint – however, we were asked to imagine that the views of our joints were flat and and had been super-imposed onto our existing grids, creating a new grid. We then imagined this new grid to be extruded, and taking four sections of this imaginary extrusion, created our new digital images. These images also included a variation of the same color scheme that we had used on our joints.

One of the two 48" x 18" digital images, showing 4 sections of the imaginary extrusion of the new grid.

One of the two 48″ x 18″ digital images, showing 4 sections of the imaginary extrusion of the new grid.

The second of the two new digital images. This one turned out a bit more precise than the first.

The second of the two new digital images. This one turned out a bit more precise than the first.

Time for Some Digital Drawing

After the creation of our initial two 3″ square joints, we were asked to choose the two most interesting moments or “spaces”, and then expand them into 4 3″ x 3″ x 9″ joints, utilizing rotation, reflection, scaling, and shearing (I’ll post photos of those once I find my camera). We also learned how to render them in 3D using Rhinoceros 5, and having taken multiple “views” of these renderings (sections, plans, and/or axiometric views), construct two digital images (two joints per image) that incorporated our mars landscape*, two grids, and the views of our joints. These images were constructed using Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop (with the joint views coming from the 3D renderings in Rhino), and have gone through many iterations. I’m not completely satisfied with them, as I have discovered that I approached them with a more artistic lens, sometimes forgetting that architectural drawings such as these also have to objectively portray information about their subject matter. That has by far been my biggest struggle – drawing with both the “subjective” artistic and “objective” engineering viewpoints simultaneously.

The first of the two 36″x36″ digital drawings, incorporating our two grids, multiple views of two of our four larger joints, and the martian landscape we had chosen earlier.

The second of the two 36″x36″ digital drawings. This one has a more vertical layout to accentuate the vertical nature of my 4th joint.

*The overall goal of our project is that we will be creating some sort of space/structure that deals with the terraformation of the martian landscape. This is not strictly a “building” as we are not focused on the practicality of the space but rather how a society might move through and interact with the space, as well as it’s interactions with the various parts it consists of and the landscape it is situated on. At the beginning of the semester we chose a particular mars image which will eventually become the site for our final structure.

My chosen Mars landscape.