Constructing a Pavilion – The Beginning


The main project for our 2nd year Design Studio class is the construction of a pavilion that would theoretically be constructed on an actual site in downtown Troy NY. The pavilion must be constructed as a “flexible” space, allowing for both performances as well as relaxation/lounging, both spontaneous and organized. For our section, the pavilion is limited to roughly 1/3 of the total square footage of the site (or roughly 1500 sq ft out of a total 4600 sq ft), and should address issues such as permanence vs temporariness, exterior vs interior, and public vs private.

To begin the project, each student was given a joint based off of a “connection” between two beams that did not utilize anything other than the beam material (i.e. no external nailing). We were asked to transform these joints in various ways to explore the connection and how it could be opened/closed in various ways. From these transformations we then constructed 4″ x 4″ x 12″ study models of the joint (sometimes multiple times as the joint evolved). I chose a mixture of basswood and cold press (as I wanted to bring out the central piece that attached the outer two pieces) – I was particularly interested in the outer vs. the inner, and how your perception of the joint changed as you took it apart.

Two 15″ x 60″ drawings were also made to illustrate the transformation process – one in axonometric view, the other in plan.

A compilation of the two transformation drawings. The left shows an axonometric view of the joint, while the right shows a plan view of the joint (both top and bottom).

A compilation of the two transformation drawings. The left shows an axonometric view of the joint, while the right shows a plan view of the joint (both top and bottom).

The original study model of the joint (corresponds step 3 on the transformation drawings).

The original study model of the joint (corresponds step 3 on the transformation drawings).

The original study model of the joint, exploded to show its internal nature.

The original study model of the joint, exploded to show its internal nature.

The second iteration (study model) of the joint.

The second iteration (study model) of the joint.

The second iteration (study model) of the joint, exploded to illustrate its internal nature.

The second iteration (study model) of the joint, exploded to illustrate its internal nature.

EDIT 06.25.13: added updated drawings.

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