Joint Exploration – Various Drawings

Following the transformation and construction of our joint (and the subsequent drawings illustrating our process), we were asked to explore the nature of our joint through two new 30″ x 30″ drawings – one showing multiple views of the joint (plan, section, elevation), the other a more “abstract” perspective drawing. I chose to include a blue color-scheme beyond the simple gray tones because I wanted to emphasize the central connector piece, similar to my choice to construct the piece out of wood for the physical model.

A perspective exploration of the joint. I chose to explode the pieces to emphasize/show the inner and outer natures of the joint.

A perspective exploration of the joint. I chose to explode the pieces to emphasize/show the inner and outer natures of the joint.

Another exploration of the joint, utilizing various views (section, plan, and elevation).

Another exploration of the joint, utilizing various views (section, plan, and elevation).

We were also asked to explore the model we had built through photography, experimenting with camera placement, lighting, and various “construction” methods, i.e. organizing the parts of the joints in systems they may not have originally been designed for.

The four final, edited photos, showing various viewpoints and configurations of the joint.

The four final, edited photos, showing various viewpoints and configurations of the joint.

EDIT 06.25.13: added updated drawings.

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Constructing a Pavilion – The Beginning

The main project for our 2nd year Design Studio class is the construction of a pavilion that would theoretically be constructed on an actual site in downtown Troy NY. The pavilion must be constructed as a “flexible” space, allowing for both performances as well as relaxation/lounging, both spontaneous and organized. For our section, the pavilion is limited to roughly 1/3 of the total square footage of the site (or roughly 1500 sq ft out of a total 4600 sq ft), and should address issues such as permanence vs temporariness, exterior vs interior, and public vs private.

To begin the project, each student was given a joint based off of a “connection” between two beams that did not utilize anything other than the beam material (i.e. no external nailing). We were asked to transform these joints in various ways to explore the connection and how it could be opened/closed in various ways. From these transformations we then constructed 4″ x 4″ x 12″ study models of the joint (sometimes multiple times as the joint evolved). I chose a mixture of basswood and cold press (as I wanted to bring out the central piece that attached the outer two pieces) – I was particularly interested in the outer vs. the inner, and how your perception of the joint changed as you took it apart.

Two 15″ x 60″ drawings were also made to illustrate the transformation process – one in axonometric view, the other in plan.

A compilation of the two transformation drawings. The left shows an axonometric view of the joint, while the right shows a plan view of the joint (both top and bottom).

A compilation of the two transformation drawings. The left shows an axonometric view of the joint, while the right shows a plan view of the joint (both top and bottom).

The original study model of the joint (corresponds step 3 on the transformation drawings).

The original study model of the joint (corresponds step 3 on the transformation drawings).

The original study model of the joint, exploded to show its internal nature.

The original study model of the joint, exploded to show its internal nature.

The second iteration (study model) of the joint.

The second iteration (study model) of the joint.

The second iteration (study model) of the joint, exploded to illustrate its internal nature.

The second iteration (study model) of the joint, exploded to illustrate its internal nature.

EDIT 06.25.13: added updated drawings.

Second Semester – A Summary

My apologies for not updating this blog about the new projects we have been working on for the second semester (which began back on January 22nd) – due to the large amounts of work for our various classes (both architecture-related and not) I have not had the time to properly photograph and document our current projects until now. I will be posting a couple posts in the next few days to try and bring things up to speed.

The following is an updated look on what is new this semester:

Design Studio, the main architecture course that generated most of the work already posted here and which must be continued through Sophomore year (at which point the function of the class switches to a “Vertical Studio”, or design “focus” as it were), continues this semester with a new professor and a new location on the 4th floor of the Greene Building (the “1st year floor”). Previously, the small group of 15 students of which I was a part of, taken from the larger freshman archie class of 78, had been taught by Prof. Anthony Titus, an artist and architect who not only taught one of the five 1st year studio sections but also managed the entire 1st year program (you can see his profile on the RPI Architecture website here). At the end of each semester, the groups are re-organized and each student is taught by a new professor. This semester, myself and two other students from Prof. Titus’s section are now in Prof. Elena Perez-Guembe’s section (You can see her profile here).

Besides the Design Studio course, all architecture students must take the Materials and Design course, which introduces us to various materials and how (and why) they function in various different forms. I will be posting photos from this course here, as it also pertains to my architectural studies.

Beyond these two courses all 1st years (unless exempt due to AP credits and the like) are required to take the following three courses:

  • B&TA, or Building and Thinking Architecture, an architecture history course. B&TA 1 and 2 happen during our first two semester, with B&TA 3 occurring during our second year.
  • General Physics (or Physics 1, depending on AP credits and such)
  • One Humanities/Social Science course, of which I chose Intro to the Philosophy of Religion