Final Site Model – Stage 2

The second stage of our final project was the creation of two sections and one plan of our model as drawings, to allow for proper reading of the conceptualized model. Using color and various line types/weights, the images were some of the more technical ones we had produced during the semester.

A plan of the model. Black represents solid that is being cut through, while all other colors are the actual surfaces as they would be colored. I attempted to use the grid in the background to differentiate between a white surface and the background or "void" in the model (traditionally displayed as white).

A plan of the model. Black represents solid that is being cut through, while all other colors are the actual surfaces as they would be colored. I attempted to use the grid in the background to differentiate between a white surface and the background or “void” in the model (traditionally displayed as white).

A section cut through the foundation of the model. Black represents solid, while white is surface. The various notches/voids where the pieces would site and/or create can be seen throughout the section.

A section cut through the foundation of the model. Black represents solid, while white is surface. The various notches/voids where the pieces would sit and/or create can be seen throughout the section.

This section is more of a shot looking down at the model - no part of the model is actually cut in section. All colors (including black) are representative of the actual colored surface.

This section is more of a shot looking down at the model – no part of the model is actually cut in section. All colors (including black) are representative of the actual colored surface.

Final Site Model – Stage 1

Following the exploration of the previous joints and drawings, we were tasked with our final project of the semester – to create a 16″ x 42″ model of our Martian site as constructed from our previous explorations. This “site” model was to be created based on our previous joints/concepts we had developed, using repetition/mirroring/scaling to take our pattern and extend it for the full 42 inches. Like our previous joints, this model would consist of parts that could be removed and put back together, and would also continue our color scheme. The idea was to take the patterns/spaces we had already developed and extend them to the Martian landscape, exploring how a society might move through and exist within the space (or lack of space) created. Thus, the creation was not a “building” per se, but rather an exploration of form and space as it might pertain to its inhabitants.

Using various sketches I created a design based on the two joints I had constructed out of basswood (and subsequently painted), allowing the two joints to alternate, as well as mirror and rotate, throughout the design. Various pieces of the original joints were merged or skewed to allow for the new model to flow and become one part out of many.

From these sketches, we were tasked to take our model and construct it in Rhino, to allow for proper planning of its construction. Below you can see the model during its conception within Rhino, as well as multiple renderings created of the concept (using plugins within the Rhino interface).

A screenshot of the Rhino interface, with the model in its various parts. The model had been copied many times to perform various operations, such as sections and plans, as well as separated into it's individual pieces in an attempt to organize the parts for construction. The colors represent parts that lie within different "layers" within Rhino and do not represent the final coloring of the model.

A screenshot of the Rhino interface, with the model in its various parts. The model had been copied many times to perform various operations, such as sections and plans, as well as separated into its individual pieces in an attempt to organize the parts for construction. The colors represent parts that lie within different “layers” within Rhino and do not represent the final coloring of the model.

A rendering of the conceptualized site model.

A rendering of the conceptualized site model.

Site Plan Rendering 2

A rendering from a different angle, to show where solids and voids may lie.

The model was required to¬†incorporate¬†some form of slope into the design – I attempted to accentuate this via a “growth” of the pattern as it traversed the model (scaling). One of the largest difficulties I faced was finding a way for the two different joints (one being very angular and horizontal, the other linear and vertical) to work and flow together. Thus, certain portions of the model were also extended or removed in various directions to attempt to accentuate the conflicting horizontal and vertical as well as angular and linear tendencies of the model. I feel that this also is representative of a society, which may consist of many differing and perhaps conflicting parts or ideas, but yet they still all come together to allow for a functioning whole.

The model was conceived to sit on a “base” or ground, from which the various parts would arise. This ground would become the locking mechanism for the parts. A secondary locking system consisted of various “mask pieces” (a continuation of the mask from previous models) which would sit over portions of the model. These masks became the second concept behind the model – certain parts of a society are readily visible to an outside observer, but other portions are hidden, and certain parts must be removed in order to see these inner workings.